News

Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Nonprofit Quarterly reported that teacher strikes, in West Virginia and Kentucky, to Oklahoma, and now Colorado and Arizona, have educators swarming state capitals to say “enough.” Enough with salaries that start low and stay there; enough with leaky ceilings and outdated textbooks; enough with classrooms that contain more students and fewer resources every year.

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Thursday, April 19, 2018

Andrea Whitsett has been named director of Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University. She has served as interim director since August.

"After a national search, Andrea emerged as the best candidate to continue the important work of Morrison Institute," said Jonathan Koppell, dean of the ASU College of Public Service and Community Solutions. "Her experience, leadership and connection with the community - visible in the overwhelming support expressed by a diverse group of Arizona leaders - made this key appointment a clear choice."

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Thursday, April 19, 2018

The Tucson Sentinel reported that Arizona teachers plan to walk out of their classrooms April 26 to protest low salaries and nearly $1 billion cut from K-12 funding in the wake of the Great Recession that hasn’t yet been replaced.

As state policy makers weigh their options in response to the “Red for Ed” movement that is organizing the teacher protests, some conservatives and their allies have pointed to bloated administration costs as a reason teachers in Arizona have among the worst pay in the nation.

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Thursday, April 19, 2018

The Camp Verde Bugle published a commentary by Steve Ayers, economic development director for the Town of Camp Verde, in which he asks "Does the Verde Valley have the water certainty we need for sustainable growth?"

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Tuesday, April 17, 2018

The Tucson Weekly reported that every Wednesday morning, educators across the state have been holding morning rallies, or “walk ins,” outside their schools. The Red for Ed movement, which began in early March, is calling for a raise for educators and additional funding for schools.

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Friday, April 13, 2018

Teacher pay: It’s a topic dominating news cycles across the country, especially in Arizona. Our Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University conducted independent research in May 2017 on the issues, and senior policy advisor Dan Hunting explains what the findings indicate moving forward.

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Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Tempe & West Chandler's Wrangler News reported that if lawmakers and Gov. Doug Ducey were inclined to find money for teachers, one place they could go looking is in the taxes that the state doesn’t collect: Arizona allowed more than $13.5 billion in taxes to go uncollected in fiscal year 2017, thanks to a litany of exemptions, deductions, allowances, exclusions or credits. And that number is likely to grow by another $1-to-2 billion once individual income tax deductions are tallied.

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Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Arizona Capitol Times reported that Gov. Doug Ducey won’t meet with the leaders of two teacher groups to talk about salaries and related issues even as they are taking the first steps toward a walkout. The governor’s statement comes less than a week after a request by Arizona Educators United and the Arizona Education Association to discuss not just the 20 percent salary increase to compete with neighboring states but also restoring education levels to where they were a decade ago.

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Tuesday, April 10, 2018

KTAR News Phoenix reported on current classroom conditions shown in photos posted on social media by dozens of Arizona teachers that included old and worn out textbooks, broken desks and carpets held together with duct tape.

Noah Karvelis, a lead organizer with Arizona Educators Untied, said these photos are a result of poor funding for Arizona public schools. The state ranks near the bottom of the nation for K-12 funding.

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Friday, April 6, 2018

Phoenix New Times reported that Arizona elementary teachers are no longer the worst-compensated in the country, but rather second-to-last behind Oklahoma.

New teacher pay numbers from Morrison Institute for Public Policy at Arizona State University indicate that the median teacher pay in Arizona inched up slightly between 2016 and 2017. Elementary teacher pay increased around 4.7 percent, but Arizona's way behind neighboring states. When adjusted for cost-of-living, elementary teacher pay in Arizona ranks 49th nationwide.

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